Advertisement

A New Stage in the History of Publishing Seminal Experimental Pathology Research in the Journal

Open AccessPublished:April 22, 2011DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajpath.2010.11.046
      With this issue, The American Journal of Pathology carries a new designation: Published by Elsevier, Inc. This is the next in a long line of evolutionary changes for the Journal, changes that have enabled it to remain dynamic, responsive to, and reflective of our authors, readers, and Society members who comprise the research pathology community.

      A History of Change

      Change is not new to the Journal or to its parent Society. The Journal has a rich publication history stretching back more than 100 years.
      • Madara J.
      A new editor on the occasion of the centennial celebration of the Journal (maybe).
      Its roots can be found in The Journal of the Boston Medical Sciences, first published in 1896 and later published by Harvard University Press as The Journal of Medical Research beginning in 1901. The first issue bearing the name The American Journal of Pathology appeared in January 1925, published as the official journal of the American Association of Pathologists and Bacteriologists (AAPB). In 1976, the AAPB merged with the American Society for Experimental Pathology, a founding member of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Pathology, to form the American Association of Pathologists (AAP). This was then reincorporated in 1992 as the current American Society for Investigative Pathology (ASIP). That same year, Nelson Fausto began his tenure as Editor-in-Chief of The American Journal of Pathology, and the Journal itself began its life as a self-published journal.
      I have had the opportunity to be part of the leadership of the Society since 1990. That was a banner year for me. I published my first article
      • Castronovo V.
      • Colin C.
      • Claysmith A.P.
      • Chen P.H.S.
      • Lifrange E.
      • Lambottte R.
      • Krutzsch H.
      • Liotta L.A.
      • Sobel M.E.
      Immunodetection of the metastasis-associated laminin receptor in human breast cancer cells obtained by fine-needle aspiration biopsy.
      in the Journal and also attended my first ASIP Council meeting as Chair of the Education Committee. At that time, the Journal was published commercially by J. B. Lippincott Co. I was part of the leadership that decided to move the Journal to self-publication 19 years ago, and since then, as Council member, ASIP President, and now Executive Officer, I have witnessed and been proud to be an active force in the Journal's evolution and growth.

      Growth Through Change

      As the Journal begins this next phase of its evolution, the question naturally arises: Was self-publication an experiment that failed? Hardly. Under the leadership of our appointed Editors (Nelson Fausto, James Madara, Jay McDonald, and now Michael Lisanti), in-house journal staff, and Publications Committees and other Society leadership, The American Journal of Pathology has experienced tremendous success in its tenure as a self-published journal. We have developed incredibly rich and deep expertise in the practices and policies surrounding biomedical publishing, enjoyed financial stability, and fortified the Journal's position as the premier resource and most-cited journal in research pathology.
      Our goal in embarking on this relationship with Elsevier is not because we are stepping back from our commitment to the Journal but because we want to ensure the continued focus by the Society on editorial quality, while also allowing a broader framework for dissemination of scientific discovery and introduction of technological enhancement. The decision to move to managed publication was not undertaken lightly. Scientific publishing is undergoing tremendous pressures from factors such as the Open Access movement, adoption of new publishing and discoverability technologies, and increased globalization of content. This changing climate has put traditional revenue streams such as institutional subscriptions at risk, while also demanding higher levels of diligence, investment, and innovation. While The American Journal of Pathology has had strong success as a self-published nonprofit society journal, ASIP wants to ensure that the Journal remains able to provide continued technological innovation and financial stability, while still ensuring the high editorial and production quality of published articles.

      Understanding the Future

      So what does this mean? Under managed publishing, the Society still owns the Journal, maintains copyright, and retains full editorial control, but production, promotion, and other publishing support services are provided by the contract publisher. The American Journal of Pathology remains the official journal of the ASIP, and our commitment to the scientific mission of the Society and the Journal's role in fulfilling that commitment remains firm. Our journal website will continue to make publicly available those articles that were published more than 12 months previously. Society members will continue to receive the Journal online as a member benefit, and the surcharge for optional print issues will remain at its low cost (and in fact, will be less costly for international members than previously possible). Regular members of the Society who are corresponding authors of articles published in the Journal will continue to receive one free color figure as a benefit of membership. The rigorous quality peer review and editorial process will remain the same for authors submitting to and publishing in the Journal. We will continue to support full compliance with the enhanced public access requirements of the National Institutes of Health, Wellcome Trust, and other funding bodies by depositing final published articles on behalf of such authors in PubMed Central (PMC) and UKPMC for public release.
      You will notice a new look and a richer experience when you visit the Journal online. As Open Access policies and other scientific publishing practices evolve, we will be able to meet them effectively and always with an eye to maintaining the Society mission. All visitors to the Journal site will be able to preview CME test questions. Journal content will be housed not only on the main journal platform but will also be reachable through extended platforms such as ScienceDirect and JournalsConsult.
      Our commitment and expertise does not fade with a move to managed publishing. We consider this the next phase in our stewardship of the Journal, serving as advocates of the science as well as our constituents – the readers, authors, and Society members who comprise our scientific community. We remain as engaged as ever in the success of the Journal in fulfilling the scientific mission of the Society. Our goal in moving to managed publication is preservation and broadening of the same tenets that have made The American Journal of Pathology successful under self-publication, and we welcome Elsevier to join us in executing this trust.

      References

        • Madara J.
        A new editor on the occasion of the centennial celebration of the Journal (maybe).
        Am J Pathol. 2001; 159: 1183-1185
        • Castronovo V.
        • Colin C.
        • Claysmith A.P.
        • Chen P.H.S.
        • Lifrange E.
        • Lambottte R.
        • Krutzsch H.
        • Liotta L.A.
        • Sobel M.E.
        Immunodetection of the metastasis-associated laminin receptor in human breast cancer cells obtained by fine-needle aspiration biopsy.
        Am J Pathol. 1990; 137: 1373-1381