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Corrections

        In the article entitled, “Toward Routine Use of 3D Histopathology as a Research Tool” (Volume 180, pages 1835–1842 of the May 2012 issue of The American Journal of Pathology), the support footnote should have included the following: “This work was partially funded through WELMEC, a Centre of Excellence in Medical Engineering funded by the Wellcome Trust and EPSRC (grant WT088908/Z/09/Z ).”
        In the April 2012 This Month in AJP feature (Volume 180, page 1333) highlighting “Amyloid Precursor Protein Is a Biomarker for Transformed Human Pluripotent Stem Cells,” the first author's name was misspelled. The correct surname is Venkataramani.
        In the article entitled, “ALDH1-Bright Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Cells Are Associated with CD44 Expression, Drug Resistance, and Poor Clinical Outcome” (Volume 180, pages 1159–1169 of the March 2012 issue), the location of the National Defense Medical Center was incorrectly listed in the author affiliations and in the Acknowledgments. The correct affiliation is National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan.
        In the article entitled, “Loss of Msx2 Function Down-Regulates the FoxE3 Expression and Results in Anterior Segment Dysgenesis Resembling Peters Anomaly” (Volume 180, pages 2230-2239 of the June 2012 issue), details for reprint requests were included, but the corresponding author's contact information was inadvertently omitted. Please address correspondence to Jinsong Zhang, M.D., Eye Hospital of China Medical University, Department of Ophthalmology, the 4th Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Provincial Key Laboratory of Lens Research, Liaoning, China 110005. E-mail: cmu4h-zjs@126.com .

        Linked Article

        • Toward Routine Use of 3D Histopathology as a Research Tool
          The American Journal of PathologyVol. 180Issue 5
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            Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and examination of tissue at microscopic resolution have significant potential to enhance the study of both normal and disease processes, particularly those involving structural changes or those in which the spatial relationship of disease features is important. Although other methods exist for studying tissue in 3D, using conventional histopathological features has significant advantages because it allows for conventional histopathological staining and interpretation techniques.
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        • This Month in AJP
          The American Journal of PathologyVol. 180Issue 4
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            The following highlights summarize research articles that are published in the current issue of The American Journal of Pathology.
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        • Loss of Msx2 Function Down-Regulates the FoxE3 Expression and Results in Anterior Segment Dysgenesis Resembling Peters Anomaly
          The American Journal of PathologyVol. 180Issue 6
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            Complex molecular interactions dictate the developmental steps that lead to a mature and functional cornea and lens. Peters anomaly is one subtype of anterior segment dysgenesis especially due to abnormal development of the cornea and lens. MSX2 was recently implicated as a potential gene that is critical for anterior segment development. However, the role of MSX2 within the complex mechanisms of eye development remains elusive. Our present study observed the morphologic changes in conventional Msx2 knockout (KO) mice and found phenotypes consistent with Peters anomaly and microphthalmia seen in humans.
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        • ALDH1-Bright Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Cells Are Associated with CD44 Expression, Drug Resistance, and Poor Clinical Outcome
          The American Journal of PathologyVol. 180Issue 3
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            The role of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) as an ovarian cancer stem cell marker and its clinical significance have rarely been explored. We used an Aldefluor assay to isolate ALDH1-bright (ALDH1br) cells from epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines and characterized the properties of the stem cells. ALDH1br cells were enriched in ES-2 (1.3%), TOV-21G (1.0%), and CP70 (1.2%) cells. Both ALDH1br and ALDH1low cells repopulated stem cell heterogeneity, formed spheroids, and grew into tumors in immunocompromised mice, although these processes were more efficient in ALDH1br cells.
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